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Latest News

Abbey Booklets on sale

A range of booklets about Tewkesbury Abbey are now on sale in the Abbey Shop. Buy any two of the...
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Tewkesbury in Bloom

This is our Coronet. Come and see the fantastic display put on by Tewkesbury in Bloom.
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Christmas Card

The Abbey Christmas Card is now available from the shop. £3.99 for a pack of 5 cards The message...
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Today's Events

Morning Prayer


Start Time : 07:30:00


End Time: 08:00:00


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Holy Communion

There is a service of Holy Communion every day in the Abbey


Start Time : 08:00:00


End Time: 08:30:00


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Evening Prayer


Start Time : 17:30:00


End Time: 18:00:00


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Prayer Tree

A Prayer for

 

Please pray for our friend who is visiting her family in South Africa, before facing cancer treatment for a second time. She is a very special friend and desperately needs your prayers.

 

Posted by Ann at 12:12 on 00/00/0000

Roof Bosses at Tewkesbury Abbey

 

The ribs of the lierne vaulting of the Abbey's many ceilings 
intersect in a variety of ornately carved stone bosses.
Most famous are the fifteen above the central nave which illustrate the life of Christ. Most unusual are those that flank them, above the sides of the nave, which show angels playing musical instruments.

 

The last supper bossThe God Bossa ceiling boss

 

             Boss showing The Last Supper          Boss showing Christ in Majesty

 

In the aisles, ambulatory and chapels gilded bosses abound, amongst them over 50 foliate heads, 

Blue Green Foliate Head

more commonly known as Green Men. Although regarded as pre-Christian, they are found in religious houses all over the world. There are four main types of Green Man: ‘foliate’ in which the face becomes leaves;  ‘disgorging‘ where leaves issue from the mouth; ‘bloodsucker’ where branches and leaves spring from the mouth; and ‘Jack in the Green’, often simply a head peering out of a frame of foliage. The meaning of these foliate heads is much debated. Some regard the Green Man as a fertility figure, while others now consider him to be a representation of one of the seven deadly sins, probably Lust.  One common theme unites them all: the communion between man and the natural world.